Category Archives: Recipes

The cow jumped over it, Neil Armstrong landed on it, and…

…we’re over the moon for this recipe.  In honor of the 45th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing on July 20th, we present our version of the moon pie.

The first Moon Pies were made by the Chattanooga Bakery in 1917 and were based upon requests from hungry coal miners. When a Chattanooga Bakery salesman visited a company store that catered to coal miners, the miners told him they wanted something solid and filling, because they often didn’t get time for a full lunch. When the salesman asked them how big the snack should be, a miner framed his hands around the moon hanging in the sky and said, “About that big.”

Chocolaterie Stam  Mini Moon Pies
The easiest way ever to make this vintage classic, this recipe calls for just four ingredients, and takes less than 10 minutes to make! Enjoy a nostalgic favorite in no time at all!
Makes 12

24 Vanilla Wafer cookies
1 cup mini marshmallows
1 cup Chocolate Stam dark chocolate drops
1 tablespoon coconut oil

Directions

Lay vanilla wafer cookies out on a clean work surface, curved side up. Place ½ cup of mini marshmallows in a microwave-safe bowl and microwave them for 15-20 seconds, just until melted and fluffy.

Working quickly, spread about 1 ½ tablespoons of melted marshmallow on the curved side of 6 vanilla wafers. Press a second wafer on top, curved-side down. This will give your final cookies a flat top and bottom (just like the original Moon Pies!)

Repeat with the second ½ cup of marshmallows.

In another small microwave-safe bowl, melt Stam dark chocolate drops with coconut oil for 30 seconds. Stir and return to microwave for another 30 seconds. Stir once more and return to microwave, if needed. Chocolate will melt before it gets hot, and your goal it to get a smooth chocolate without it actually being warm to the touch. This will keep your chocolate from mottling as it cools.

Plunge cookies into the chocolate mixture. Transfer to a piece of parchment paper. Once all cookies have been dipped, place them in the fridge for 10-15 minutes to all the chocolate to harden.

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Lift a glass to Chocolate!

Here’s the skinny.  First off…. GET GOOD CHOCOLATE!

The more sugar in the chocolate, the more sweetness we need to consider for the wine. #1 rule of thumb when pairing up desserts with wine; the wine should always be perceived as sweet as the chocolate. When it comes to chocolate, the higher the percent of cocoa, the less sugar in the chocolate

So to make wine and chocolate pairing easier, you may simply refer to the tables below.

Red Wines and Chocolate Pairings
Wines Chocolate
Beaujolais Extra Dark Chocolate
Cabernet Sauvignon Dark Chocolate
Merlot Dark Chocolate
Pinot Noir Dark Chocolate/Milk Chocolate
Sangiovese Dark Chocolate
Zinfandel Dark Chocolate

White wines have a light body which goes very well with milk chocolates. But if you are feeling adventurous, you might also experiment with white wine and white chocolate pairing.

When it comes to dessert wine, you should toss the rules about wine and chocolate pairings. Champagnes seem to go well with almost any type of chocolate, while Port and Sherry are on opposite ends of the chocolate spectrum.

White Wines and Chocolate Pairings
Wines Chocolate
Chardonnay White Chocolate
Riesling Milk Chocolate
Sauvignon Blanc Milk Chocolate

When it comes to dessert wine, you should toss the rules about wine and chocolate pairings. Champagnes seem to go well with almost any type of chocolate, while Port and Sherry are on opposite ends of the chocolate spectrum.

Dessert Wines and Chocolate Pairings
Champagne & Sparkling Wine Almost any kind of Chocolate 
Port Dark Chocolate
Sherry White Chocolate

Next Month, we will show specific bonbons and chocolates from our Chocolaterie Stam selections that will pair best with the wines above.

Serving Suggestion

Serving Suggestion

Chocolaterie Stam Pineapple Tapas

Boca is what Central Americans call them. In Mexico, they are known as botanas. In Spain, they are called tapas.

Designed to encourage conversation, the serving of tapas, allows social interaction without the concern of eating an entire meal.  Also, in some countries it is customary for diners to stand and move about while eating tapas.  It is a cuisine that is exquisite, yet informal.

 

Stam Chocolate Pineapple Tapas

Ingredients:

Chocolaterie Stam 70% Extra Dark Chocolate Drops
1 pineapple
*Optional:  toasted almonds, toasted coconut, or graham cracker crumbs

Directions:

Core and peel fresh pineapple. Slice into 1 1/2 inch slices making them rings.

Place in large non-stick skillet and grilled on medium to high heat until slightly golden. Turn and repeat on the other side until all are toasted. Set aside to cool. Tamp pineapple rings lightly with paper towels to remove excess moisture (moisture may cause your chocolate to seize).  After cooling, cut rings into sixths and place at the end of a toothpick or skewer.

Melt Chocolaterie Stam 70% Extra Dark Chocolate Drops on low heat either in double boiler or microwave method.

Once melted, dip the skewered pineapple chunks in the 70% Extra Dark Stam Chocolate and place on wax paper covered tray.  Place in refrigerator until set.

*After pineapple is dipped in chocolate and before chocolate is set,  place the skewered fruit on a bed of optional toppings.

We at Chocolaterie Stam want you think about our chocolate the same way—sophisticated yet approachable; in other words, delicious and affordable.  Can you think of other ways to combine chocolate and fruit for your next intimate gathering?

Do you Crackle, Kladdkaka, or Hagelslag?

World Chocolate

(L to R) Crackle, Kladdkaka, and Hagelslag

It occurs to us, at Chocolaterie Stam that, because we are of Dutch origin, we may enjoy common foods differently than our American friends do.  Don’t get us wrong, we loooooove (six o’s!) a good American apple pie, yet shouldn’t we stop to consider how the rest of the world loves their chocolate?

The Aussies eat crackles, and the Swedes love their kladdkaka…

Aussie Crackle
Easy to make, the Australian crackle is often a sweet treat associated with children’s parties, along with “fairy bread”.

Ingredients:

  • 2/3 cup confectioners’ sugar
  • 3 tbsp. Chocolaterie Stam baking cocoa powder
  • ¾ cup coconut oil (available at most gourmet and health food markets)
  • ½ cup shredded, unsweetened coconut
  • ½ tsp. salt (optional)
  • 2 cups rice crispies

Directions:

  1. Sift the cocoa and confectioners’ sugar into a bowl. Whisk together gently.
  2. To melt the coconut oil, immerse the jar in hot water for a few minutes. Measure out ¾ of a cup and whisk it into the cocoa and sugar until mixture is smooth.
  3. Whisk in the shredded coconut, salt and then the rice crispies.
  4. Spoon into cupcake holders and refrigerate.

Yields: 12 chocolate crackles

Swedish Kladdkaka
Known in Sweden as kladdkaka, or chocolate sticky cake, is another way that the world enjoys chocolate.

Ingredients:

  • 2 eggs
  • 1 1/3 cups sugar
  • 1/2 cup cake or all-purpose flour
  • 1/8 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 cup melted butter
  • 4 Tbsp. Chocolaterie Stam baking cocoa
  • 1 Tbsp. vanilla sugar (or substitute 1 tsp. vanilla extract)

Preparation: 

Preheat oven to 350º. Lightly butter a round 8” or 9” springform or cake pan.

Whisk together the eggs and sugar. Gradually mix in the flour and salt.

Stir cocoa and vanilla sugar (or vanilla extract) into melted butter until well-combined. Add cocoa-butter mixture to batter, stirring well until any lumps are removed.

Pour batter into prepared pan. Cook in 350º oven for 25 minutes. Check for doneness; the edges of the cake should be crisp but the center still moist and sticky (Tip: A good test is to insert a toothpick first into the cake’s edge: it should come out clean. Then, insert it into the center of the cake. It should come out smeared with gooey, melting chocolate). Do not overcook (but if you do, you’ll have stellar brownies as a compensation prize!).

Dust with powdered sugar and serve with whipped cream, if desired.

Yield: 6-8 servings, for people with restraint.

 

Dutch Hagelslag

The Dutch love their chocolate “hagelslag” or chocolate hail.  No need to use a recipe, just put the purchased sprinkles on buttered bread and enjoy.

Is this the first you’ve heard of chocolate kladdkaka, crackle or hagelslag?  What other international ways do you know of eating chocolate?  Leave a comment and let us know.

No Yolks. Just Fun.

Drink recipe of the Month: April

Born of the soda fountain era, the legendary Egg Cream is deceptive, for its flavor and texture depend entirely on the correct preparation. There is no egg in an Egg Cream, but if the ingredients are mixed properly, a foamy, egg-white-like head tops the drink. The invention of the Egg Cream is credited to Louis Auster, a Brooklyn candy shop owner in 1890. Auster’s concoction sold for three cents, and he sold as many as three thousand on a hot summer day. Lines would form down the street and around the corner, and it tarted a tradition of drinking the egg cream while standing — never sitting.

Stam Chocolate Easter Egg Cream
No yolks, just fun. (Get it?)

Ingredients

1/4 cup cold whole milk
2 tablespoons chocolate syrup (store-bought, or homemade Stam syrup)
Cold club soda
Ice
Directions

In a 16-ounce chilled tall glass, stir together the milk and chocolate syrup until combined.

Slowly fill the glass with club soda. Serve immediately.

(Click here to see an egg cream how-to video.)

Replenish Tired Muscles with Chocolate Milk

In honor of the post-Winter Olympics:

Downing chocolate milk after a tough workout can help replenish exhausted muscles and significantly aid exercise recovery, new research shows.

Post-Workout Drinks

When it’s time to choose a liquid chug after a long, tough workout, there’s a slew of options out there. Water? Gatorade, POWERade, or All Sport? Endurox R4? Physiologist Joel Stager, director of the Human Performance laboratory at IndianaUniversity, has even one more potential workout recovery drink to add to the list: chocolate milk. His latest study, published in this month’s International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, names this kids’ favorite an optimal post-exercise recovery aid.

Before your stomach recoils, take a look at chocolate milk’s ingredient list. For a high-endurance athlete, Stager’s team sees it as a catch-all workout recovery drink. Compared to plain milk, water, or most sports drinks, it has double the carbohydrate and protein content, perfect for replenishing tired muscles. Its high water content replaces fluids lost as sweat, preventing dehydration. Plus it packs a nutritional bonus of calcium, and includes just a little sodium and sugar — additives that help recovering athletes retain water and regain energy.

Drinking plain water after exercise replaces sweat losses — and that’s it. “Chocolate milk provides carbohydrate replenishment to your muscles — something they can metabolize,” said Jason Karp, MS, another researcher for this study. “There’s nothing to metabolize in water.”

Stager’s assessment of chocolate milk is even simpler. “It’s water plus a whole lot more,” he said.

(Reprinted from Fitness Magazine)

So, here’s what Stam says you need to make your own chocolate syrup for milk

MOOOOVE over,  Quik!

Stam Chocolate Syrup for milk

Ingredients:

1 1/2 cups hot water
3 cups sugar
1 1/2 cups Chocolaterie Stam Baking Cocoa
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
2 tablespoons light corn syrup *

Equipment:

Sauce pan

Whisk

Squeeze bottles
Directions

In a small pot bring water and sugar to a boil and whisk in cocoa, vanilla, salt, and corn syrup. Whisk until all of the solids have dissolved.  Continuous stirring sauce until slightly thickened.  Strain and cool to room temperature. Pour into squeeze bottles. Squeeze into cold milk and stir for delicious chocolate milk or serve on your favorite ice cream.  Store under refrigeration for about 2 weeks.  And, hey, it’s fat free!

*May substitute brown rice syrup for the light corn syrup, for a little healthier version